Why the name “Sheepdog Self Protection Inc?”

On Sheep, Wolves and Sheep­dogs

(From the book, On Com­bat, by Lt. Col. Dave Gross­man)

Hon­our never grows old, and hon­our rejoices the heart of age. It does so because honor is, finally, about defend­ing those noble and wor­thy things that deserve defend­ing, even if it comes at a high cost. In our time, that may mean social dis­ap­proval, pub­lic scorn, hard­ship, per­se­cu­tion, or as always, even death itself.”

The ques­tion remains: What is worth defend­ing? What is worth dying for? What is worth liv­ing for?”

- William J. Ben­nett, in a lec­ture to the United States Naval Acad­emy, Novem­ber 24, 1997

Most of the peo­ple in our soci­ety are sheep. They are kind, gen­tle, pro­duc­tive crea­tures who can only hurt one another by acci­dent. They are the sheep.

Then there are the wolves. The wolves feed on the sheep with­out mercy. There are evil peo­ple in this world and they are capa­ble of evil deeds. The moment you for­get that or pre­tend it is not so, you become a sheep. There is no safety in denial.

If you have no capac­ity for vio­lence, then you are a healthy pro­duc­tive cit­i­zen: a sheep. If you have a capac­ity for vio­lence and no empa­thy for your fel­low cit­i­zens, then you are a wolf. If you have a capac­ity for vio­lence and a deep love for your fel­low cit­i­zens then you are a sheep­dog, a war­rior, some­one who is walk­ing the hero’s path. You live to pro­tect the flock and con­front the wolf.

We know that the sheep live in denial; that is what makes them sheep. They do not want to believe that there is evil in the world. The sheep gen­er­ally do not like the sheep­dog as they look a lot like the wolf. They have the capac­ity for vio­lence. The dif­fer­ence, though, is that the sheep­dog must not, can­not, and will not ever harm the sheep. 

The sheep­dog dis­turbs the sheep. The sheep­dog is a con­stant reminder that there are wolves in the land. The sheep would much rather have the sheep­dog cash in his fangs, spray paint him­self white, and go, “Baa.” Until the wolf shows up. Then the entire flock tries des­per­ately to hide behind one lonely sheep­dog.